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Posts Tagged ‘Liu Xiaobo’

China Digital Times is showcasing two examples that the government’s efforts to tarnish Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo and silence his supporters have not been entirely successful. One, the cover of Southern Metropolis Daily,  is a symbol-laden illustration showing empty chairs, cranes and a man trying to halt the cranes’ progress. Click here for a shot of the page and an explanation of its symbolic meaning: http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/12/netizens-interpret-empty-chairs-on-the-cover-of-southern-metropolis-daily/

The other example consists of posts on a popular Chinese blogging site and on Twitter that all are titled, “The Lius I admire.” Each brief post appears to follow a formula that congratulates a “person with the surname Liu” for his or her fighting spirit and resistance to injustice.  You can see a description of this endeavor here: http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/12/the-lius-i-admire/

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This year’s Nobel Peace Prize winner, imprisoned Chinese democracy activist Liu Xiaobo, has been silenced and punished for years because he spoke out in favor of free speech and an end to one-party rule in China. The picture of an empty chair at the award ceremony today speaks eloquently about Liu’s oppression, and his own words about banishing hatred from his country are astonishing evidence of why the Chinese government feared the power of his public proclamations. For a translation into English of Liu’s final address to the court that sentenced him to 11 years in prison, go to this link at the China Digital Times, a project of the journalism school at the University of California in Berkeley: http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/02/liu-xiaobo-i-have-no-enemies-my-final-statement/#

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After a spate of hysterical denunciations about interference in Chinese affairs and cultural imperialism, the Nobel Peace Prize ceremony slated for this Friday (Dec. 10) is now being greeted in Chinese media with a thunderous silence. No doubt propaganda authorities have ordered news media not to mention imprisoned Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, who is serving 11 years in prison for advocating freedom of speech, an act considered to be subversion.

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China Digital Times has published two weeks’ worth of orders to Chinese media from censorship authorities, which it says are cheekily referred to by Chinese journalists and bloggers as “Directives from the Ministry of Truth.” Of special note are instructions forbidding any mention of the Nobel Prize ceremony scheduled for Dec. 10, at which imprisoned Chinese activist Liu Xiaobo will be awarded the Peace Prize. A link to the China Digital Times posting is below. A column about the results of censorship (which had to be written without mentioning censorship) can be found on the Columns page under the post, “An elephant in the room.”

“Latest directives from the Ministry of Truth,” http://chinadigitaltimes.net/2010/11/latest-directives-from-the-ministry-of-truth-october-22-november-7-2010/

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